Intel’s process roadmap to 2025: Are there 4nm, 3nm, 20A, and 18A

The new specification for 2024: ribbon transistors When moving to 20A, a key feature of the roadmap stands out: Intel’s process name refers to Angstroms, not nanometers. At this point, as mentioned above, Intel will switch from its FinFET design to a new type of transistor called the GateAllAround or GAAFET transistor.

Intel’s process roadmap to 2025

Intel's process roadmap to 2025: Are there 4nm, 3nm, 20A, and 18A

As far as Intel is concerned, the commercial name they provide for its version is RibbonFET. After the standard FinFET is exhausted, the semiconductor industry is expected to switch to GAAFET design. Each leading supplier has a different name for its implementation (RibbonFET, MBCFET), but they all use the same principle. Basic: Flexible wide transistor system with multilayer control transistor current.Intel's process roadmap to 2025: Are there 4nm, 3nm, 20A, and 18A

 

The area that provides power, power, or current should be optimized for each individual mobile radio device. Image Samsung Intel has been discussing GAAFET at technical semiconductor conferences and international VLSI conferences for many years. June 2020-Technical Director Dr Mike Mayberry showed the electrostatic enhancement map of the transition to ATM design.

Intel's process roadmap to 2025: Are there 4nm, 3nm, 20A, and 18A

At that time, we asked Intel about the timetable for large-scale ATM deployment, and they told us that we expected it “within 5 years.” Intel RibbonFET currently offers a 20A process. According to the above roadmap, it is expected to be produced by the end of 2024. The Intel RibbonFET chart for this event shows PMOS and NMOS devices, as well as designs that clearly look like 4-stack designs.

Intel's process roadmap to 2025: Are there 4nm, 3nm, 20A, and 18A
Intel's process roadmap to 2025: Are there 4nm, 3nm, 20A, and 18A

After seeing Intel’s demonstration of 2 to 5 stacks at industry conferences, we confirmed that Intel will actually implement 4 stacks. Quote from Dr Intel’s Kelleher: “It’s easier to remove a stack than to add a stack! The exact number of stacks for a given process or function is still an active area of ​​research, but Intel doesn’t seem to mind four. Compared to its competitors, Intel TSMC is expected to switch

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pratik patil
pratik patil

Technology and innovation that includes the word "smart" are things that Pratik Patil strongly supports. This fuels his passion for writing about everything the technology sector has to offer.

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